Helvetica

Helvetica/Helvetica Neue

Helvetica or Neue Haas Grotesk is a widely used sans-serif typeface developed in 1957 by Swiss typeface designer Max Miedinger with input from Eduard Hoffmann. Miedinger and Hoffmann set out to create a neutral typeface that had great clarity, no intrinsic meaning in its form and could be used on a wide variety of signage.  Originally named Neue Haas Grotesk (New Haas Grotesque), it was rapidly licensed by Linotype and renamed Helvetica in 1960, similar to the Latin adjective for Switzerland, Helvetia.

 

                               Click to enlarge image

The original letterforms of Helvetica had to be modified for the Linotype system. Over the years, Helvetica was expanded to include many different weights, but these were not coordinated with each other.
In 1983, D. Stempel AG redesigned and digitized the “Neue Helvetica” typeface for Linotype and made it a self-contained font family. Today, this family consists of 51 different font weights. 

 

Home   I   A Body of Work